Limitless Nexus
Search site

Member Info
Nicholai

Power Level: 170
(Total Points: 6033)

Member Since: 2015-09-25 18:36:39 MST

Actions

Sponsor
 


Home Biography Weblog Contributions Favorites Friends Whiteboard

Biography
No biography written.


View full biography

Most recent weblog entry
2018-06-04 14:51:03 MST
Staying hydrated, cardio exercise and green tea are the 3 main keys to healthy blood. Recent research indicates vinegar and alcoholic drinks heals everything the main 3 keys fail to cover regarding blood. This article on alcohol and vinegar seems very accurate. Wine is the most efficient source of alcohol in my opinion because most people do not use the proper types of vinegar. Red wine and vinegar with the mother are the optimal combination based on my research.

https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/blog/the-alcohol-vinegar-cure/

Here are two prescriptions I can go for: Drink some wine; eat some salad dressing. Recent studies show that 1–2 alcoholic drinks a day appear to cut the risk of diabetes by 45% and that 2 tablespoons of vinegar before a meal lowers blood glucose levels after the meal.

Vinegar seems to increase insulin sensitivity and slow the rate at which sugar is absorbed from a meal into the bloodstream. So it helps people with both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Previous studies have shown that vinegar is associated with reduced blood pressure and cholesterol levels as well.
Advertisement

Most of these studies come from Europe. A Greek study published in Diabetes Care says that we do not know how vinegar reduces blood glucose. Vinegar may delay gastric emptying, block simple carbohydrates from breaking down into sugar, and/or stimulate liver and muscles to soak up more glucose.

This is actually nothing new. Studies have shown that vinegar improves insulin sensitivity in people with Type 2 or insulin resistance. Now we know it helps people with Type 1 as well.

But vinegar is not that easy to take straight or dissolved in water. Probably the best way for most people is to mix it with other flavors and use it as a salad dressing or on cooked vegetables.

Maybe the alcohol prescription would be more fun. An article from Reuters news service reports on a Dutch study of 35,000 people. People who had one or two alcoholic drinks a day had 45% less chance of developing Type 2 diabetes, compared to teetotalers. Forty-five percent is a pretty big benefit from drinking a glass of wine or liquor!

This result has been seen before, but scientists refused to credit the alcohol. They theorized that the moderate drinkers might live healthier lifestyles in other ways. The Dutch study suggests other lifestyle factors do not explain the findings, because “the lower risk was seen among men and women whose diabetes risk was already relatively low because of their weight and lifestyle habits — namely, not smoking, eating a healthy diet and getting regular exercise.” Since even those who were living relatively healthy lives saw the benefit, the drinking seems to be the most likely candidate for the source of their better health. The study was published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Moderate drinking also helps arthritis. Another Reuters article reports on a Swiss study of 2,900 adults with rheumatoid arthritis. The study found that, “light-to-moderate drinkers showed slower progression in their joint damage compared with non-drinkers. Heavy drinkers, on the other hand, showed the greatest progression.” The subjects were followed over an average of four years. The study was reported in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatism.

What’s the Connection?
I have to think the alcohol and vinegar effects are related. Alcohol and vinegar both come from fermented plant matter. In moderate amounts, they seem to make the body use carbohydrates more efficiently, and possibly to reduce inflammation. This seems to be a benefit for people who eat much plant-based food. There must be some kind of evolutionary connection here, but I don’t know what it is. Maybe you guys can figure it out.

We don’t need to know the whys of these findings to make them work for us. The cardiac benefits of moderate drinking have been reported many times. According to the Mayo Clinic, moderate drinking means two drinks a day for men 65 and under, one drink a day for women or men over 66. Mayo says drinking more than that puts you at risk for certain types of cancer, liver problems, and heart failure. (Editor’s Note: Additionally, because of the risk of alcoholism and other health conditions associated with drinking alcohol, most health experts currently do not recommend that nondrinkers take up moderate drinking for the sake of potential health benefits.)

It doesn’t seem to matter if the alcohol comes in the form of liquor, wine, or beer. They’re all good, if you don’t overdo it. Some studies hint that red wine may be best, but no one is sure.

A similar thing may apply to vinegar. Apple cider vinegar gets all the publicity for being a natural treatment for almost any problem, but some studies use other kinds of vinegar, so it might not make a difference which one you use.

If you can’t drink, perhaps because of a history of alcoholism, you might try resveratrol tablets. Resveratrol is found in the skin of grapes and may account for part of the health benefits of wine.

If you don’t want to have vinegar, you can take vinegar capsules. A Mendosa.com reader named Renee Gerger says, “Vinegar pills have changed my blood sugar control in a positive manner…I have dawn syndrome and by taking two pills at bedtime I have eliminated it completely. I now have normal readings in the a.m. and most of the day.” Renee said she has been able to reduce her repaglinide (brand name Prandin) by taking the vinegar capsules.
 
View all weblog entries

Write on whiteboard
Please log in or create an account to write on Nicholai's whiteboard.

Whiteboard
Nicholai - 2018-09-10 02:39:48 MST
In a study, gerbils fed a combination of uridine monophosphate, choline, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were found to have significantly improved performance in running mazes over those not fed the supplements, implying an increase in cognitive function.[5]

In foods
In brain research studies, uridine monophosphate is used as a convenient delivery compound for uridine.[6] Uridine is the active component of this compound. Uridine is present in many foods, mainly in the form of RNA. Non-phosphorylated uridine is not bioavailable beyond first-pass metabolism, as it is almost entirely catabolised in the liver and gastrointestinal tract.[7]

See also
Nucleoside
Nucleotide
DNA
RNA
Oligonucleotide
Pyrimidine biosynthesis
References
Lide M, Lide DR (1998). CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (87 ed.). CRC Press. pp. 3–56. ISBN 978-0-8493-0594-8.
Voet D, Voet JG, Pratt CW (2008). Fundamentals of Biochemistry (3rd ed.). John Wiley & Sons.
Berg J, Tymoczko JL, Stryer L (2006). Biochemistry (6th ed.). San Francisco: W. H. Freeman. ISBN 0-7167-8724-5.
Winkler JK, Suttle DP (July 1988). "Analysis of UMP synthase gene and mRNA structure in hereditary orotic aciduria fibroblasts". American Journal of Human Genetics. 43 (1): 86–94. PMC 1715274 Freely accessible. PMID 2837086.
Holguin S, Martinez J, Chow C, Wurtman R (November 2008). "Dietary uridine enhances the improvement in learning and memory produced by administering DHA to gerbils". FASEB Journal : Official Publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. 22 (11): 3938–46. doi:10.1096/fj.08-112425. PMC 2574024 Freely accessible. PMID 18606862. Lay summary – ScienceDaily.
Wurtman RJ, Cansev M, Sakamoto T, Ulus IH (2009). "Use of phosphatide precursors to promote synaptogenesis". Annual Review of Nutrition. 29: 59–87. doi:10.1146/annurev-nutr-080508-141059. PMID 19400698.
Gasser T, Moyer JD, Handschumacher RE (August 1981). "Novel single-pass exchange of circulating uridine in rat liver". Science. 213 (4509): 777–8. doi:10.1126/science.7256279. PMID 7256279.
vte
Nucleic acid constituents
Nucleobase
Purine Adenine Guanine Hypoxanthine Xanthine Purine analogue Pyrimidine Uracil Thymine Cytosine Pyrimidine analogue Unnatural base pair (UBP)
Nucleoside
Ribonucleoside
Adenosine Guanosine 5-Methyluridine Uridine 5-Methylcytidine Cytidine Inosine Xanthosine Wybutosine
Deoxyribonucleoside
Deoxyadenosine Deoxyguanosine Thymidine Deoxyuridine Deoxycytidine Deoxyinosine Deoxyxanthosine
Nucleotide
(Nucleoside monophosphate)
Ribonucleotide
AMP GMP m5UMP UMP CMP IMP XMP
Deoxyribonucleotide
dAMP dGMP dTMP dUMP dCMP dIMP dXMP
Cyclic nucleotide
cAMP cGMP c-di-GMP c-di-AMP cADPR
Nucleoside diphosphate
ADP GDP m5UDP UDP CDP
dADP dGDP dTDP dUDP dCDP
Nucleoside triphosphate
ATP GTP m5UTP UTP CTP ITP XTP
dATP dGTP dTTP dUTP dCTP dITP dXTP
vte
Nucleotide metabolic intermediates
Purine metabolism
Anabolism
R5P→IMP:
R5P PRPP PRA GAR FGAR FGAM AIR CAIR SAICAR AICAR FAICAR
IMP→AMP:
Adenylosuccinate
IMP→GMP:
Xanthosine monophosphate
Catabolism
Hypoxanthine Xanthine Uric acid 5-Hydroxyisourate
Pyrimidine metabolism
Anabolism
Carbamoyl phosphate Carbamoyl aspartic acid 4,5-Dihydroorotic acid Orotic acid Orotidine 5'-monophosphate Uridine monophosphate
Catabolism
uracil:
Dihydrouracil 3-Ureidopropionic acid β-Alanine
thymine:
Dihydrothymine β-Ureidoisobutyric acid 3-Aminoisobutyric acid
vte
Purine receptor modulators
Receptor
(ligands)
P0 (adenine)
Agonists: 8-Aminoadenine Adenine
P1
(adenosine)
Agonists: 2-(1-Hexynyl)-N-methyladenosine 2-Cl-IB-MECA 2'-MeCCPA 4'-O-β-D-Glucosyl-9-O-(6''-deoxysaccharosyl)olivil 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine Adenosine ADP AMP Apadenoson ATL-146e ATP BAY 60–6583 Binodenoson Capadenoson CCPA CGS-21680 CP-532,903 Evodenoson GR 79236 LUF-5835 LUF-5845 N6-Cyclopentyladenosine Namodenoson Neladenoson dalanate Piclidenoson Regadenoson SDZ WAG 994 Selodenoson Sonedenoson Tecadenoson UK-432,097
Antagonists: 8-Chlorotheophylline 8-Phenyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine 8-Phenyltheophylline Acefylline Aminophylline ATL-444 Bamifylline Cafedrine Caffeine Caffeine citrate Cartazolate CGH-2466 CGS-15943 Choline theophyllinate Ciforadenant CPX CVT-6883 Dimethazan DMPX DPCPX Dyphylline Enprofylline Etazolate Fenethylline IBMX Isovaleric acid Istradefylline KF-26777 MRE3008F20 MRS-1220 MRS-1334 MRS-1706 MRS-1754 MRS-3777 Paraxanthine Pentoxifylline Preladenant Propentofylline Proxyphylline PSB-10 PSB-11 PSB-36 PSB-603 PSB-788 PSB-1115 Reversine Rolofylline SCH-442,416 SCH-58261 Theacrine Theobromine Theodrenaline Theophylline Tozadenant Tracazolate VUF-5574 ZM-241,385
P2
(nucleotide)
P2X
(ATP)
Agonists: 2-Me-SATP α,β-Me-ATP Adenosine ADP AMP Ap4A Ap5A ATP ATPγS BzATP Cibacron blue CTP D-β,γ-Me-ATP GTP HT-AMP Ivermectin L-β,γ-Me-ATP MRS-2219 PAPET-ATP UTP Zinc
Antagonists: 5-BDBD A-317491 A-438079 A-740003 A-804598 A-839977 AF-353 AZ-10606120 AZ-11645373 BBG Calcium Calmidazolium Chelerythrine Copper Emodin (Rheum officinale) Evans Blue Gefapixant GW-791343 HMA Ip5I isoPPADS JNJ-47965567 KN-04 KN-62 Magnesium MRS-2159 NF-023 NF-110 NF-157 NF-279 NF-449 Opiranserin (VVZ-149) Oxidized-ATP Phenol Red Phenolphthalein PPADS PPNDS PSB-12062 Puerarin (Radix puerariae) Purotoxin 1 RB-2 Ro 0437626 Ro 51 RO-3 Sodium ferulate (Angelica sinensis, Ligusticum wallichii) Suramin TC-P 262 Tetramethylpyrazine (ligustrazine) (Ligusticum wallichii) TNP-ATP Zinc
P2Y
Agonists: 2-Me-SADP 2-Me-SATP 2-Thio-UTP 5-Br-UDP 5-OMe-UDP α,β-Me-ATP Adenosine ADP ADPβS Ap3A AR-C 67085MX ATP ATPγS CTP dATP Denufosol Diquafosol IDP ITP INS-365 INS-37217 MRS-2365 MRS-2690 MRS-2693 MRS-2768 MRS-2957 MRS-4062 NF-546 PAPET-ATP PSB-0474 PSB-1114 UDP UDPβS UDP-galactose UDP-glucose UDP-N-acetylglucosamine Up3U UTP UTPγS
Antagonists: 2-Me-SAMP A3P5PS AMPαS Ap4A AR-C 66096 AR-C 67085MX AR-C 69931MX AR-C 118925XX ATP BzATP C1330-7 Cangrelor Clopidogrel Elinogrel Ip5I MRS-2179 MRS-2211 MRS-2279 MRS-2395 MRS-2500 MRS-2578 NF-157 NF-340 PIT PPADS Prasugrel PSB-0739 RB-2 Regrelor Suramin Ticagrelor Ticlopidine UDP
Transporter
(blockers)
CNTs
6-Hydroxy-7-methoxyflavone Adenosine dMeThPmR Estradiol KGO-2142 KGO-2173 MeThPmR Phloridzin Progesterone
ENTs
Barbiturates Benzodiazepines Cilostazol Dilazep Dipyridamole Estradiol Ethanol Hexobendine NBMPR Pentoxifylline Progesterone Propentofylline
PMAT
Decynium-22
Enzyme
(inhibitors)
XO
Allopurinol Amflutizole Benzbromarone Caffeic acid Cinnamaldehyde Cinnamomum osmophloeum Febuxostat Myo-inositol Kaempferol Myricetin Niraxostat Oxipurinol Phytic acid Pistacia integerrima Propolis Quercetin Tisopurine Topiroxostat
Others
Aminopterin Azathioprine Methotrexate Mycophenolic acid Pemetrexed Pralatrexate Many others
Others
Precursors: Adenine Adenosine AMP ADP ATP Cytosine Cytidine CMP CDP CTP Guanine Guanosine GMP GDP GTP Hypoxanthine Inosine IMP IDP ITP Ribose Uracil Uridine UMP UDP UTP

Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License;
 
View all whiteboard entries
 
Most popular exhibitions

Most recent favorites

Friends